Posts tagged Digital print
When Creativity Comes from Within
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Maintaining focus on the new collection whilst writing and reflecting here is more important than documenting my own development regarding understanding digital marketing here I think? You may disagree?

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Creating the ‘We Are Here’ collection was exciting because I was experimenting with my creative expression whilst keeping to the core concept of the brand about the visibility of women of colour.

Coupling the artistic element with my own experiences was cathartic because it is an ongoing internal dialogue for me especially regarding my own identity and perceptions of self.

This design, ‘Where Are you From? You Look Like You’re From…’ Is a direct response to my own experiences growing up and still to this day.

When you have mixed heritage, sometimes it may be obvious what you ethnic background is sometimes not, as is the case for my mum and I.

Most people are intrigued and can sense that we are not ‘fully English’, so it becomes a guessing game of sorts and more fun, particularly for me when the answers vary significantly.

Speaking with other mixed heritage, mostly women, about this they tell very similar stories. Especially if their heritage is of Indian descent, like my mums. They find that the most common guess is Spanish or South American too, which of course is not a problem. But again interesting as we also hear that we do not look typically Indian, whatever that is.

Either way, we are white passing which enables us to live a much more privileged life than many other people of colour. So it is important to maintain perspective on this aspect.

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This design, ‘Where Are you From? You Look Like You’re From…’ Is a direct response to my own experiences growing up and still to this day.

When you have mixed heritage, sometimes it may be obvious what you ethnic background is sometimes not, as is the case for my mum and I.

Most people are intrigued and can sense that we are not ‘fully English’, so it becomes a guessing game of sorts and more fun, particularly for me when the answers vary significantly.

Speaking with other mixed heritage, mostly women, about this they tell very similar stories. Especially if their heritage is of Indian descent, like my mums. They find that the most common guess is Spanish or South American too, which of course is not a problem. But again interesting as we also hear that we do not look typically Indian, whatever that is.

Either way, we are white passing which enables us to live a much more privileged life than many other people of colour. So it is important to maintain perspective on this aspect.

This design ‘What’s Up’ came from a linear drawing of two Indian Model from Vogue India. They were styled in traditional sari’s but had so much sass, they really captured my imagination and I knew I wanted to include them as a design.

I felt they embodied the way in which women are feeling much more empowered with not only their bodies but also their voice. Being unapologetic for their opinions and being authentically them and this is what I want to remember when I wear and look at this t-shirt. I hope others do too.

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Tentative times

The title says it all. Aside from one where the colour is not as expected, the t-shirts are on the production line. As a result, more sampling is happening to check the colour is as close to the vibrancy as I want. Tentively waiting for the delivery so I can check everything is ok before the next stage. 

The labels have arrived. Brand, sizes, and wash care although I forgot to include the fabric composition and where they are made! Reorder pronto! Live and learn I say, which will be my mantra throughout this whole project / start up.   

Name labels - exciting!  

Name labels - exciting!  

It is interesting how the business evolves; what your vision was to begin with and how it unfolds and the sacrifices you have to make. There have been a lot. Originally I was going to have the fabric made into a t-shirt that I had specifically designed. But cost became an issue so I have opted for a different cut. But now questioning this choice and some of the details, namely the collar. I am wondering if I can tweak them once I receive them whilst having the labels sewn in? Many many questions. 

Then it will be photo shoot time for the t-shirts to go on to the website and for the look book to be created. I am really excited about this as I get to be really creative again experimenting with colour and composition. Giving Tania Swift a strong visual aesthetic.

Look book board of inspiration  

Look book board of inspiration  

Then of course it will be time to sell sell sell. Will people be happy with their purchase? Will they sell well? How can I promote them more and more, get them exposed to the right audiences?

It is time to get researching again and being as savvy as possible, whilst seeking out many wise words from those who are experienced in this industry. This will be the key to my success!   

Copyright © 2016 TaniaSwiftLtd, All rights reserved.

Voguing

Many artists seek inspiration from the fashion world and Vogue is no exception.  What I find interesting is not only the motivation of each artist but the aesthetic of each final outcome. 

Andrea Mary Marshall    

Andrea Mary Marshall

 

Graham Dolphin   

Graham Dolphin

 

Artist unknown

Artist unknown

Andrea Mary Marshall appropriating the cover of Vogue using the image of Frida Kahlo, is a particular favourite of mine, not only due to the subject matter being an artist herself but because she is of Mexican heritage, which apart from her country of origin, may not be a common ethnicity to grace the cover of Vogue, making quite a poignant but artistic statement. The painterly quality is very gestural and the text, not in keeping with traditional magazine type or layout creates a more alluring 'cover' in my opinion.  

The second piece, by Graham Dolphin, is one from a collection of covers he has appropriated.  I find this one particularly intriguing due to the mask like nature of the punctured holes that is both alarming and fascinating.  Usually the model/celebrity would be enhanced, creating or reinforcing negative expectations of what beauty ideals are.  Here the model is almost censored with a mask that is beautifully decorative in many ways however the holes create an aggressive statement perhaps referencing the negative impact the fashion world has on many women.

Lastly, the final image is the most poignant in terms of linking to my brands USP.  The layering up of many covers demonstrates the magazines integrity to its layout being firmly applied every issue.  However the models on the cover blend in to one as they are seemingly of the same ethnicity, caucasian.  Highlighting the lack of diversity in celebrating woman from a variety of backgrounds is particularly alarming for a country such as the UK whose capital city, London, prides itself on being cosmopolitan along with many other cities and towns.  Making the lack of representation not acceptable.  How are young women meant to feel empowered and inspired if no role models, akin to themselves in terms of ethnicity, are shown in mainstream media?

Art is a powerful platform to showcase these ideas and open up various discourse to raise awareness.  And with the continuing collaboration of the art and fashion world transcending many boundaries, I hope, will draw peoples attention to yet another worthwhile cause, that ethnicity and the fair representation of it is fundamentally important.

 

Copyright © 2016 TaniaSwiftLtd, All rights reserved.